Contact

Subscribe via Email

Subscribe via RSS/JSON

Categories

Recent Posts

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
© Rakhesh Sasidharan

Elsewhere

Get a list of machine names and logged on or active user(s)

The Win32_LoggedOnUser class gives a list of logged on users to a computer. It isn’t just users logged on interactively to the console or Remote Desktop (which is a good thing) but even users connected remotely via shared folders and such (not a good thing).

But just for the curious (and since I fiddled with it today) here’s how you can format the output of this class properly.

You can use PowerShell to get instances of this class via the Get-WMIObject cmdlet thus:

The output has a lot of material, so best to filter by the Antecedent property.

Instead of Format-Table you may use Select-Object or anything else you fancy.

To query remote computers using the -ComputerName switch.

The output isn’t precise. You get a list of local accounts as well, and there are repeat entries.

In my case I want to limit to the domain accounts. Also I want to skip accounts starting and ending with the “x” character (as these are my admin accounts) and any accounts entering with a “$” character (as these are machine accounts). And I want to eliminate the duplicates. So here’s what I did:

Once again, the beauty of PowerShell is that you can glue things together. So, for instance, if I want to get a list of machines in my domain along with the currently logged in users, I can do that.

To get a list of machines in a particular OU I use the following (this requires the ActiveDirectory module to be imported first!):

I already have the code for getting the logged in user on a machine, so all I need to do is pipe the output of the Get-ADComputer to Format-Table and tell it to populate the user column dynamically. Like thus:

The code within the Expression block is similar to the code for querying a single machine, except that I replace the machine name with $_.Name.

The output is a list of machines with the logged in user(s). If there are no logged in users that field is empty {} else it’s a single user name or a list of user names.

Of course, the Win32_LoggedOnUser class isn’t useful if users access each other’s machines via shared folders and such; but in that case it’s just a matter of replacing the Expression block above with code that gives more focussed results. Two great posts on how to list logged in users on a machine are this and this.

I wanted to expand the code above to also include IP addresses too. A PowerShell one-liner to get IP address from a name is the following:

To limit the output to just the IP address do the following:

And to restrict to just IPv4 addresses add the following:

Going by these it’s pretty obvious what we have to do to add an IP address column: