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PVS Steps

I need a central place/ post where I can write down (and keep adding) the steps required for a PVS image. Consider this as a continuation to a previous post. So here goes:

  1. Install the OS.
  2. Install Updates and Device Drivers; including integration tools such as VMware Tools, XenServer Tools, etc. 
  3. Install any applications & VDA. (No shutdown or domain join at this point – but you could domain join if needed, just don’t reuse that name later in the catalog)
  4. Install the Target Device software (this is the Provisioning Services target device software).
  5. Launch the imaging wizard. (No need for snapshots as we are capturing to a new vDisk)
    1. The wizard will ask for a Target Device name. This can be different from the name of the machine/ VM. This is a PVS representation of the device.
    2. Give a vDisk name too.
    3. Upon creation this vDisk will be in private mode – which means only 1 machine can boot off it, and the disk is read/write.
  6. Power off the VM.
    1. If this VM will be used as the Master Target Device going forward, delete or remove the original hard disk. And go to the device object in PVS and change the “Boot from” to vDisk.
    2. Alternatively: If this VM will not be used as the Master Target Device, create a new VM (maybe give it the same name as the Master Target Device in PVS) and put its MAC address to the Master Target Device in PVS. Also change the “Boot from” to vDisk.
    3. Note: If the “Boot from” is not changed to vDisk the VM will try to boot from the local disk and fail if it’s not present.
  7. Power on the VM. It will boot from the vDisk now (which is still in private mode). Make any more changes if required. Example domain join and add more applications etc. Whatever changes we make now will be written to the vDisk.
  8. When everything is finalized power off the VM.
  9. Convert the vDisk to standard mode. This means multiple machines can boot off it and the disk is read only (the writes will be made to a write-cache disk).
    1. Note: the VM must be powered off to be able to change the disk type. There has to be no connections to the vDisk.
  10. Now create a template based on the hardware specs you want for your VMs. Memory, CPU, etc. This template won’t have any storage. It will network boot.
  11. From PVS console launch the XenDesktop Setup wizard. At one point it will ask for the template & vDisk we created above.
    1. Quick note on the disk options.
    2. With MCS we had the option of choosing random or static. Within random we had the option of using RAM as a cache. And within static we had the option of (a) using a personal vDisk or (b) a dedicated VM or (c) discarding changes.
    3. With PVS our options are again random or static. No sub-options within random (i.e. no RAM cache etc). And within static the only options are (a) personal vDisk or (b) discard changes.
  12. That’s all. New VMs will be created that can stream from the above vDisk. And AD accounts will be created for them.

Pool Machine booting up … :)

Notes on Master Image Preparation (PVS & MCS)

Reading some links on creating a Master Image; here’s notes to myself regarding that. These are the links I refer to:

Note these are very rough/ brief. These really are rough notes to myself as I am trying to make organize my mind. 

In case of PVS: Master Target Device – this is the VM whose image is used  to create a virtual hard disk (vDisk). This vDisk is what PVS uses to stream to its VMs.

Unlike MCS, the Master Target Device does not have to be a VM. PVS works against both VMs and physical machines. It does not care about the compute; all it does is look at the machine and create a vDisk by capturing its contents. You network boot into the machine you want to capture, and PVS creates an image by streaming its contents to the PVS server to create a vDisk. 

The Master Target Device or its disk can be removed after vDisk creation.

Here’s my understanding of the order in which to do stuff:

1. Install the OS

2. Install Updates and Device Drivers; including integration tools such as VMware Tools, XenServer Tools, etc. 

In case of MCS:

3. Install any applications (optional) & VDA & domain join (optional) & shutdown the machine. 

4. Add it to MCS to create a catalog. Recommended that we take a snapshot and point MCS to this snapshot. Else MCS will make its own snapshot (and we can’t change the snapshot name). 

In the case of PVS:

3. Install any applications & VDA. (No shutdown!) (No domain join!)

4. Install the Target Device software (this is the Provisioning Services target device software).

5. Launch the imaging wizard. (No need for snapshots either as we are capturing it to a new vDisk). 

5a. Note: The Target Device name can be different from the name of the machine/ VM. 

6. After the vDisk is created we use a VM (existing or new one) to network boot and use this vDisk. Then we can domain join etc. PVS has a lot more steps. Check out http://www.carlstalhood.com/pvs-master-device-convert-to-vdisk/

Update: I have a post that goes into more detail with PVS.

Components of the Provisioning Services target device software include an imaging wizard to capture the image, a NIC filter driver used for streaming images from the PVS server to the target devices (remember: the target device software is not used only for capturing the image – i.e. the master target device, but also by the target devices after an OS is loaded), a virtual disk to store the OS and applications (again, used by the target devices). There’s also a system tray utility. 

PVS Console XenDesktop Setup Wizard crash and timeout

If you get the following error when running the “XenDesktop Setup Wizard” from PVS console (and a catalog is created with no machines):

Or you get the following error (and again a catalog is created but no machines):

Or you get neither of these but the PVS Console simply freezes when you click OK/ Next at one of the steps and it throws an error about timeout and being unable to connect to the remote server (sorry no screenshot, forgot to take it when I got the error and now I can’t replicate it) …

The solution is simple! Install the PVS Console on your Delivery Controller server and run the wizard from there. For some reason that seems to do the trick. Thanks to this forum post