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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

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Enabling SNMPv3 on ESXi hosts

A continuation to my earlier post which was to do with SNMPv2.

As before, connect to the vCenter via PowerCLI. And as before the set() method can be used to set SNMP – both v2 and/or v3. The definition of this method is as follows:

That’s confusing so best to copy paste the definition into notepad or something so you can be sure you are passing the correct arguments.

First things first. There doesn’t seem to be a way of turning off something. As in, say you already have SNMPv2 turned on, you can’t turn it off by setting the community strings to blank. Doing so generates an error. So if you want to turn previous things off it’s best to do a reset and start with a clean slate.

This sets things back to their defaults:

Before going ahead with any SNMPv3 configuration we need to decide on what authentication and privacy protocols to use. In my case I want to use SHA1 and AES-128. So I need to set that first:

Once I have done this I can generate the hashes. I will need this later to configure SNMPv3.

In the example above both my passwords are Password1.

With this in hand I configure SNMPv3:

That’s it really. In the above example I will be using an SNMPv3 user called snmpUser1.

Now to do it across my estate I can make a loop. No need to create password hashes for each host. The hash stays the same as long as you are using the same password for each host.

That’s all!

Enabling SNMP on ESXi hosts

I wanted to enable SNMP on our ESXi hosts for monitoring via Solarwinds. Here’s what I did. (I am doing this kind of generically, using variables etc, so I can script the thing for multiple hosts).

First I connected to the vCenter Server from PowerCLI.

Next I got its ESXCLI object. This will let me run ESXCLI commands against the host.

To view the current status of SNMP you can do can invoke a get() method –

Nothing’s configured currently. To configure something we can use the set() method. From the definition of this method we can see it takes a whole bunch of parameters –

Here’s what I did to configure SNMP. I want a community string of “public”, enable SNMP, and specify two trap destinations.

The result of that will either be a true or false. The get() method can be used again to confirm it is set correctly. And the test() method can be used to test it works –

Now Solarwinds will be able to poll the host via SNMP.

To do this en-masse on all your hosts the following should help –

Shout out to this VMware blog post which helped a lot and has more info.

The above script failed on some of our ESX hosts with the following error –

Turns out these hosts only accept 16 parameters instead of 17 (the one called largestorage is missing). Not sure why. All our hosts are ESXi 5.5 but am thinking the problem ones are perhaps not using the HP customized version of ESXi.

Anyways, so I modified my script above to take care of this –

Also, just for my own info – the $null above means the parameter is not set. If that parameter already has a value on the server it is not over-written. To over-write or blank out the existing value replace $null with "".