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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

Elsewhere

Tip: View hidden files and folders in PowerShell

Just as a reference to my future self …

To view hidden files & folders in a directory via PowerShell use the -Force switch with Get-ChildItem:

Tip: Overriding a GPO setting via Registry

At work our Desktops team has put a policy in place that enables Outlook cached mode for every one. Which becomes a pain in the a$$ when you have to disable and enable cached mode for some users as part of fixing issues (OST file corruptions, no incoming emails, etc).

Thankfully this is a setting you can temporarily override via the registry. Just got to modify a key under HKCU.

But … if you open the registry as the affected user and try modifying the key, you can’t because of lack of permission. Expected, right? What’s the point of a policy if users can modify the registry directly to override it. Admin users can modify the key, but if you open the registry as an admin then HKCU points to the admin and not the user.

Here’s how you workaround though: open the registry by doing a “run as” as the admin. Then go to HKEY_USERS. One of the entries there will be for the user logged in. (There shouldn’t be many entries, but if there are then you can find the one you want in one of two ways: (1) Use psgetsid from the Sysnternals tools to find the SID of the logged in user. That’s the entry you want. Or (2) go to HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList. You will find entries there with the same names as under HKEY_USERS. Check the ProfileImagePath key in each – the one with the path to the logged in user is the key you want).

Once you find the key of the logged in user under HKEY_USERS that’s it. Everything under here is the HKCU of the logged in user so any changes you make here reflect HKCU. Go ahead and change whatever you want – the change will succeed because you are now using an admin account to make changes to the logged in user’s HKCU. Hah!

Hope this helps someone.