Contact

Subscribe via Email

Subscribe via RSS/JSON

Categories

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
© Rakhesh Sasidharan

Elsewhere

Exchange DAG fails. Information Store service fails with error 2147221213.

Had an interesting issue at work today. When our Exchange servers (which are in a 2 node DAG) rebooted after patch weekend one of them had trouble starting the Information Store service. The System log had entries such as these (event ID 7024) –

The Microsoft Exchange Information Store service terminated with service-specific error %%-2147221213.

The Application log had entries such as these (event ID 5003) –

Unable to initialize the Information Store service because the clocks on the client and server are skewed. This may be caused by a time change either on the client or on the server, and may require a restart of that computer. Verify that your domain is correctly configured and  is currently online.

So it looked like time synchronization was an issue. Which is odd coz all our servers should be correctly syncing time from the Domain Controllers.

Our Exchange team fixed the issue by forcing a time sync from the DC –

I was curious as to why so went through the System logs in detail. What I saw a sequence of entries such as these –

Notice how time jumps ahead 13:21 when the OS starts to 13:27 suddenly, then jumps back to 13:22 when the Windows Time service starts and begins syncing time from my DC. It looked like this jump of 6 mins was confusing the Exchange services (understandably so). But why was this happening?

I checked the time configuration of the server –

Seems to be normal. It was set to pick time from the site DC via NTP (the first entry under TimeProviders) as well as from the ESXi host the VM is running on (the second entry – VM IC Time Provider). I didn’t think much of the second entry because I know all our VMs have the VMware Tools option to sync time from the host to VM unchecked (and I double checked it anyways).

Only one of the mailbox servers was having this jump though. The other mailbox server had a slight jump but not enough to cause any issues. While the problem server had a jump of 6 mins, the ok server had a jump of a few seconds.

I thought to check the ESXi hosts of both VMs anyways. Yes, they are not set to sync time from the host, but let’s double check the host times anyways. And bingo! turns out the ESXi hosts have NTP turned off and hence varying times. The host with the problem server was about 6 mins ahead in terms of time from the DC, while the host with the ok server was about a minute or less ahead – too coincidental to match the time jumps of the VMs!

So it looked like the Exchange servers were syncing time from the ESXi hosts even though I thought they were not supposed to. I read a bit more about this and realized my understanding of host-VM time sync was wrong (at least with VMware). When you tick/ untick the option to synchronize VM time with ESX host, all you are controlling is a periodic synchronization from host to VM. This does not control other scenarios where a VM could synchronize time with the host – such as when it moves to a different host via vMotion, has a snapshot taken, is restored from a snapshot, disk is shrinked, or (tada!) when the VMware Tools service is restarted (like when the VM is rebooted, as was the case here). Interesting.

So that explains what was happening here. When the problem server was rebooted it synced time with the ESXi host, which was 6 mins ahead of the domain time. This was before the Windows Time service kicked in. Once the Windows Time service started, it noticed the incorrect time and set it correct. This time jump confused Exchange – am thinking it didn’t confuse Exchange directly, rather one of the AD services running on the server most likely, and due to this the Information Store is unable to start.

The fix for this is to either disable VMs from synchronizing time from the ESXi host or setup NTP on all the ESXi hosts so they have the correct time going forward. I decided to go ahead with the latter.

Update: Found this and this blog post. They have more screenshots and a better explanation, so worth checking out. :)