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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

Elsewhere

Quote

Watching “Titans” on Netflix. It’s a bit of a drag but every time I think I will stop after this episode they introduce some nugget or the other (like the two Robins in episode 5) and keeps me hooked. It’s no “Daredevil” by any means more like a slightly better version of “Iron Fist”. And it seems so unnecessarily dark, like the writers decided to make it so because that’s just the current trend.

I like the title card – how they change the pictures in the letters to match the themes of the episode. Nice touch.

A good quote from episode 6, by Machiavelli.

If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared. Severities should be dealt out all at once, so that their suddenness may give less offense; benefits ought to be handed ought drop by drop, so that they may be relished the more.

Law of the Quantum of Solace

One keep hearings of “Quantum” dots with CES 2019 going on, obviously in association with the physics concepts of Quantum computing and very small in size etc. in the context of TVs. But when I think of “quantum” I think of the following passage from the “Quantum of Solace” James Bond short story by Ian Fleming.

The Governor paused and looked reflectively over at Bond. He said: “You’re not married, but I think it’s the same with all relationships between a man and a woman. They can survive anything so long as some kind of basic humanity exists between the two people. When all kindness has gone, when one person obviously and sincerely doesn’t care if the other is alive or dead, then it’s just no good. That particular insult to the ego – worse, to the instinct of self-preservation – can never be forgiven. I’ve noticed this in hundreds of marriages. I’ve seen flagrant infidelities patched up, I’ve seen crimes and even murder forgiven by the other party, let alone bankruptcy and every other form of social crime. Incurable disease, blindness, disaster – all these can be overcome. But never the death of common humanity in one of the partners. I’ve thought about this and I’ve invented a rather high-sounding title for this basic factor in human relations. I have called it the Law of the Quantum of Solace.”

Bond said: “That’s a splendid name for it. It’s certainly impressive enough. And of course I see what you mean. I should say you’re absolutely right. Quantum of Solace – the amount of comfort. Yes, I suppose you could say that all love and friendship is based in the end on that. Human beings are very insecure. When the other person not only makes you feel insecure but actually seems to want to destroy you, it’s obviously the end. The Quantum of Solace stands at zero. You’ve got to get away to save yourself. 

I copy pasted more than I wanted to so there’s some context for the quote. But the part italics (by me, not in the original text) are what I really love.

… forcefulness (personality) of the magician’s character

A paragraph from “Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell”, which I am still reading.

“But in the end,” added Dr John, “it is by the imposition of his will upon his patient that the doctor effects his cure. It is the forcefulness of the doctor’s own character which determines his success or failure. It was observed by many people that our father could subdue lunatics merely by fixing them with his eye.”

“Really?” said Strange, becoming interested in spite of himself. “I had never thought of it before, but something of the sort is certainly true of magic. There are all sorts of occasions when the success of a piece of magic depends upon the forcefulness of the magician’s character.”

So true!

[Aside] Quote

Listening to “The End of the Affair” narrated by the amazing Colin Firth (a pleasure so far to listen to! wow). This sentence caught my attention:

How twisted we humans are, and yet they say a God made us; but I find it hard to conceive of any God who is not as simple as a perfect equation, as clear as air.

[Aside] Quote

Came across this when listening to “Fahrenheit 451”:

We cannot tell the precise moment when friendship is formed. As in filling a vessel drop by drop, there is at last a drop which makes it run over; so in a series of kindnesses there is at last one which makes the heart run over.

It’s from a book by James Boswell and the full paragraph is worth reading.

[Aside] Quote from Mythos

Listening to Stephen Fry’s Mythos and I loved this epitaph from one of the stories. That of Phaëthon, son of Phoebus Apollo the sun God, who rode his father’s sun chariot for a day but lost control and ended up scorching Africa in the process (thus creating the Sahara desert). This epitaph was offered by the American classicist Edith Hamilton.

Here Phaëthon lies who in the sun-gods chariot fared.
And though greatly he failed, more greatly he dared.

[Aside] Sherlock Holmes quote

Was listening to “The Mystery of the Cardboard Box” in the bus after a particularly shitty day and loved this ending paragraph. It resonated with me.

“What is the meaning of it, Watson? said Holmes solemnly as he laid down the paper. “What object is served by this circle of misery and violence and fear? It must tend to some end, or else our universe is ruled by chance, which is unthinkable. But what end? There is the great standing perennial problem to which human reason is as far from an answer as ever.”

Godless poem – To Love What Death Can Touch

Just finished watching “Godless”. I took my time with this show coz even though I liked it I don’t think this is something I could binge watch. Funny though, that’s something I had wondered to myself – how come I like this show but don’t feel like binge watching it; does it mean I don’t really love this show thaat much? – until I came across a comment from the show’s creator and director Scott Frank on how he too feels this is not a show one can binge watch. It’s a slow burn, best enjoyed over a long time. (I think he said so on the NPR Fresh Air podcast).

A lovely poem from the show finale:

‘Tis a fearful thing
to love what death can touch.
A fearful thing
to love, to hope, to dream, to be –
to be,
And oh, to lose.
A thing for fools, this,
And a holy thing,
a holy thing
to love.
For your life has lived in me,
your laugh once lifted me,
your word was gift to me.
To remember this brings painful joy.
‘Tis a human thing, love,
a holy thing, to love
what death has touched.

– Yehuda HaLevi

That poem’s something.

It’s funny how when I read a written poem it doesn’t hit me as much as it does when I see it on a scene or someone recites it. I guess when I read a poem I just read it without really feeling it.

Endless Night

Just finished listening to Agatha Christie’s “Endless Night”. It was an amazing listen. Very unlike in tone and story to Dame Christie’s usual detective stories (but with a plot twist she has used in the past but which nevertheless came as a surprise to me here too). This was a dark story and I enjoyed it!

Came across the following from William Blake’s “Auguries of Innocence” via this book and I liked it a lot:

Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Through the world we safely go.

Joy and woe are woven fine,
A clothing for the soul divine.
Under every grief and pine
Runs a joy with silken twine.

Every night and every morn
Some to misery are born,
Every morn and every night
Some are born to sweet delight.

Some are born to sweet delight,
Some are born to endless night.

A good quote from “Murder is Easy”

Just finished listening to Agatha Christie’s “Murder is Easy” and came across this quote towards the end. Loved it.

Bridget: Liking is more important than loving. It lasts. I want what is between us to last, Luke. I don’t want us just to love each other and marry and get tired of each other and then want to marry some one else.

Luke: Oh! my dear Love, I know. You want reality. So do I. What’s between us will last for ever because it’s founded on reality.

Two nice quotes from “Wakefield”

Saw “Wakefield” (movie) just now. Loved it. Not at all what I had expected from the synopsis. That sounded like a creepy/ stalker sort of movie, but the actual movie was amazing. Two nice quotes from it.

This is from a point in the movie where the main character (Howard) realizes how he has escaped from a prison of his own making (his past behavior and insecurities):

If anything, I’ve come into my senses fully.

My god, I can see it so clearly.

I’ve constructed the whole thing.

The jealousy …

… the resentment …

…the selfish urgency.

Howard is victim.

Howard is persecutor.

Howard has mastered the world.

That was my prison. That’s what I’ve escaped.

Leaving me where now?

An outcast of cosmos.

And this is just a line he says sometime as he is watching his wife.

I just want you to want me as much as I want you.

Good stuff!

A nice quote from Maigret “Night at the Crossroads”

On men. I liked it. Found it to be very insightful and true. 

I liked Michonnet. 

He didn’t want to protect me or kiss me, or own me. He just saw a scheme where he could make some money. 

Men aren’t usually that honest with themselves. Women are a fantasy, or a path to redemption, or a way they can escape their life. 

Maybe all men want to trap you in the end. And I was sick of that. 

Broadchurch

Binge watched “Broadchurch” Season 1 last year. Loved it! It was a brilliant show about the impact of a little boy’s murder on a small town and how it unravels everyone’s lives and exposes secrets. Not just the plot but the mood, the music, the cinematography, the actors – it was all very well put together. 

Binge watched the US remake “Gracepoint” last week. It was good for a US show but not that great compared to the original (I always feel the darker British shows are better than American ones). They stretched the plot a bit but the characters and the mood was good. The ending was a letdown though. An unnecessary and illogical twist just to make this show appear different? That was a letdown. 

This week I binge watched “Broadchurch” Season 2. Was a but apprehensive coz WikiPedia it didn’t have much favorable reviews and I really didn’t want to spoil my memories of the first season, but all those worries were unfounded. “Broadchurch” Season 2 is equally great! Different from the first one but a great and sensible follow-up to the events of the first Season, with another murder mystery thrown in at the side. “Broadchurch” is never about the murder mystery anyways – in both seasons the case is solved because someone confesses – it’s always about the impact on everyone else and the revulsion at what happened. 

Don’t approach “Broadchurch” Season 2 expecting similar plot lines as the first one. Season 2 is similar but different. 

Two other good shows I enjoyed this year but didn’t get a chance to mention are “Fortitude” and “Ascension”. Check these out if you haven’t already!

Update: I liked this quote by Paul Coates in Season 2 Episode 7 (it’s from 2 Corinthians 12:8-10):

For when I am weak, then I am strong.

[Aside] What doesn’t seem like work?

From this essay by Paul Graham:

If something that seems like work to other people doesn’t seem like work to you, that’s something you’re well suited for.

That essay links to another longer essay about work and doing what you love. Have added it to my Instapaper queue.

[Aside] Some quotes

On passion

I think it’s not exactly true to say that if you do something you are passionate about, the money will come. But, if you do almost anything really diligently then the money will come. And it takes passion to have that kind of diligence. And … if you almost anything really diligently you will figure out what parts of it like and what you don’t and that will help inform your choices (when it comes to choosing a job or doing another thing). 

– Isaac Schlueter (from this podcast)

On money

Money is not the root of all evil. The love for money is the root of all evil. 

– Apparently this is the original version but somewhere along the line became misquoted. I came across this via another podcast (I think Jonathan Strickland said the correct version on the podcast)