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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

Delays with Send As permissions, Quotas, Mailbox permissions in Exchange

Send As permissions prompted this post so I’ll stick to that. But what I describe below also affects mailbox permissions, quotas, and other Exchange information stored in AD. 

Assigning someone Send As permissions in Exchange is easy. Use the EMC, or if you love PowerShell do something like this:

However, there is a catch in that the permission isn’t always granted immediately. It could be instant, but it could also take up to 2 hours.

This is because when we make a change to a user object – even of a mail related attribute such as Send As – the change isn’t immediately read by Exchange. The change is in fact made in Active Directory (notice the cmdlet above) and Exchange has to query AD to get the changed value. If Exchange were to query AD each time it needs to do something with a mail enabled user object, that would be poor performance for both Exchange and Domain Controllers. Instead, Exchange servers have a component called Directory Service Access (DSAccess) (renamed to Active Directory Access (ADAccess) since Exchange 2007) that periodically queries AD and caches the results for a period of time. When you grant someone Send As permissions as above, if Exchange’s cache isn’t updated with the latest value it will reject users trying to send email on behalf of the other user until such time the cache is updated. 

This cache is commonly referred to as Mail Box Information (MBI) Cache. 

The items in the MBI Cache are controlled by something called the Mailbox Cache Age Limit. There is a registry key HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\MSExchangeIS\ParametersSystem which has two values:

  • Mailbox Cache Age Limit – a value of type DWORD (decimal) that controls the age of the items in the cache.
    • The higher the age limit, the longer the item can stay in cache (and so won’t be refreshed). 
    • The default for this is 120 minutes (i.e. 2 hours). This is the default even if the value does not exist.
    • So this means any item present in the cache is not updated with new information for up to 2 hours – even if DSAccess/ ADAccess queries AD in between
  • Reread Logon Quotas Interval – a value of type DWORD (decimal) that controls how often the Exchange information store reads the mailbox quota information from the cache.
    • This is not relevant for the current topic but I thought to mention as it is present in the same place, and quotas are another area which commonly affect the user / administrator expectation. 
    • The default for this 7200 seconds (i.e. 2 hours). This is the default even if the value does not exist. 
    • The recommended value is 1200 seconds (i.e. 20 mins)?
    • Note that this controls how often information is read from the cache. You could read from the cache every 20 mins, but if you only update the cache every 2 hours (the default for the previous registry value) you will still get stale information! So any changes to this registry value must be done in conjunction with the previous registry value. 

To get changes made to mail objects in AD propagate faster to Exchange one must change the two values above (or at least the first one if you don’t care about quotas). 

Bear in mind though, that the above values only control how often the cache items expire or are referred to. They do not control how often DSAccess/ ADAccess queries AD for new information. This is controlled by a value at another registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\MSExchange ADAccess\Instance0:

  • CacheTTLUser – a value of type DWORD (decimal) that controls how often DSAccess/ ADAccess queries a DC for new information. 
    • The default for this is 300 seconds (i.e. 5 mins). This is the default even if the value does not exist. 
    • Lowering this value is not recommended as it will affect Exchange performance. 

Once any of these values are changed the Information Store service (or the Exchange server itself) must be restarted. 

In addition to the registry values I mention above, there’s one more worth mentioning. It isn’t too important because it’s value can never exceed that of the Mailbox Cache Age Limit, but it’s worth knowing about. In the same registry key as Mailbox Cache Age Limit – i.e. at HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\MSExchangeIS\ParametersSystem – is present another value: 

  • Mailbox Cache Idle Limit – a value of type DWORD (decimal) that controls how long an item can be idle in the cache before it is removed from the cache.  
    • The default for this is 900 seconds (i.e. 15 mins). This is the default even if the value does not exist. 
    • The maximum for this value can be up to the value of Mailbox Cache Age Limit (for obvious reasons – that’s when the item is removed anyway!).
    • This is an interesting setting. It seems to be there to introduce some randomness in how cache items are refreshed, and also to stir up the cache a bit?
      • Without it all items in the cache will expire at the same time (every 2 hours by default) and will need to be refreshed together. But with this setting some items will be periodically discarded (every 15 mins by default) if they were not accessed by the Exchange server during that interval and a fresh copy cached the next time DSAccess/ ADAccess contacts a DC. 
      • This way any object that wasn’t accessed recently will have an up-to-date copy in the cache, but objects that were accessed recently continue to be cached (and potentially have stale information). 
      • So at any given point of time the cache will have items of varying expiry time (i.e. not all will expire together in 2 hours). And the first time an item is accessed in a long time, it will possibly have the latest information. 

With this in mind one can appreciate why updates to a mail enabled object may not immediately take effect. There’s so many factors! It will depend on whether the object has past its idle time. If not, it will depend on whether the object has past its cache age. Further, if it’s a quota setting, it will also depend on the quota reread interval. Also, how often ADAccess/ DSAccess contacts a DC matters. And on top of all this, AD replication too plays a role because the change has to replicate from the DC you made it on to the DC that ADAccess/ DSAccess recently contacted to cache information.

You could be lucky in that the object you changed has just past its idle time and so ADAccess/ DSAccess will get an up-to-date copy soon. You could be lucky in that even though the object hasn’t past its idle time it’s about to expire in a few minutes and so will be refreshed. Or you could be unlucky and make a change just after the object was refreshed, and it’s not idle any time soon, so you’ll have to wait a whole 2 hours (by default) before your change takes effect! 

As Yoda would say, patience you must with Exchange and permissions. :)

p.s. While writing this post I learnt that Update Rollup 4 for Exchange 2010 SP 2 introduces the ability to automatically copy emails you send on behalf of someone to that person’s Sent Items folder too. Good to know! That’s a useful feature. 

Delays with Send As permissions, Quotas, Mailbox permissions in Exchange by rakhesh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.