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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

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NSX Firewall no working on Layer3; OpenBSD VMware Tools; IP Discovery, etc.

I have two security groups. Network 1 VMs (a group that contains my VMs in the 192.168.1.0/24) and Network 2 VMs (similar, for 192.168.2.0/24 network). 

Both are dynamic groups. I select members based on whether the VM name contains -n1 or -n2. (The whole exercise is just for fun/ getting to know this stuff). 

I have two firewall rules making use of these rules. Layer 2 and Layer 3. 

The Layer 2 rule works but the Layer 3 one does not! Weird. 

I decided to troubleshoot this via the command line. Figured it would be a good opportunity.

To troubleshoot I have to check the rules on the hosts (because remember, that’s where the firewall is; it’s a kernel module in each host). For that I need to get the host-id. For which I need to get the cluster-id. Sadly there’s no command to list all hosts (or at least I don’t know of any). 

So now I have my host-ids.

Let’s also take a look the my VMs (thankfully it’s a short list! I wonder how admins do this in real life):

We can see the filters applying to each VM.  To summarize:

And are these filters applying on the hosts themselves?

Hmm, that too looks fine. 

Next I picked up one of the rule sets and explored it further:

The Layer 3 & Layer 2 rules are in separate rule sets. I have marked the ones which I am interested in. One works, the other doesn’t. So I checked the address sets used by both:

Tada! And there we have the problem. The address set for the Layer 3 rule is empty. 

I checked this for the other rules too – same situation. I modified my Layer 3 rule to specifically target the subnets:

And the address set for that rule is not empty:

And because of this the firewall rules do work as expected. Hmm.

I modified this rule to be a group with my OpenBSD VMs from each network explicitly added to it (i.e. not dynamic membership in case that was causing an issue). But nope, same result – empty address set!

But the address set is now empty. :o)

So now I have an idea of the problem. I am not too surprised by this because I vaguely remember reading something about VMware Tools and IP detection inside a VM (i.e. NSX makes use of VMware Tools to know the IP address of a VM) and also because I am aware OpenBSD does not use the official VMware Tools package (it has its own and that only provides a subset of functions).

Googling a bit on this topic I came across the IP address Discovery section in the NSX Admin guide – prior to NSX 6.2 if VMware Tools wasn’t installed (or was stopped) NSX won’t be able to detect the IP address of the VM. Post NSX 6.2 it can do DHCP & ARP snooping to work around a missing/ stopped VMware Tools. We configure the latter in the host installation page:

I am going to go ahead and enable both on all my clusters. 

That helped. But it needs time. Initially the address set was empty. I started pings from one VM to another and the source VM IP was discovered and put in the address set; but since the destination VM wasn’t in the list traffic was still being allowed. I stopped pings, started pings, waited a while … tried again … and by then the second VM IP to was discovered and put in the address set – effectively blocking communication between them. 

Side by side I installed a Windows 8.1 VM with VMware Tools etc and tested to see if it was being automatically picked up (I did this before enabling the snooping above). It was. In fact its IPv6 address too was discovered via VMware Tools and added to the list:

Nice! Picked up something interesting today. 

NSX Firewall no working on Layer3; OpenBSD VMware Tools; IP Discovery, etc. by rakhesh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.