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© Rakhesh Sasidharan

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Firefox and ADFS WIA

Hat tip to this blog post. You have to add the URL of you ADFS server to the network.automatic-ntlm-auth.trusted-uris setting in about:config. Official documentation from Mozilla is here. Firefox, by default, does not negotiation authentication with a web server nor does it send NTLM responses. You have to explicitly whitelist sites you want to do this with.

Bear in mind you can’t do a domain wildcard either. So no “*.raxnet.global”, it has to be either “adfs.raxnet.global” or “https://adfs.raxnet.global”. Not like IE in that respect.

If in an enterprise of Windows computers you can manage this via GPOs. I don’t know how I missed it, but Firefox supports Group Policies since March 2018. Download the templates here. And while you are at it, you can also get it to pull in the enterprise root certs. Neat!

Also, I learnt the hard way that the settings for whitelisting sites don’t seem to take effect in private mode. So don’t waste time making these changes in a GPO and testing in private mode. :) if at all you need to re-test, you have to clear the history. 

Firefox Offline Installers

For my own info –

Good to have these in case you are not connected to the Interwebs and wan’t to install Firefox.

Also, this link on how to set a proxy in Firefox for all users.

Search Firefox bookmarks using PowerShell

I was on Firefox today and wanted to search for a bookmark. I found the bookmark easily, but unlike Chrome Firefox has no way of showing which folder the bookmark is present in. So I created a PowerShell script to do just that. Mainly because I wanted some excuse to code in PowerShell and also because it felt like an interesting problem.

PowerShell can’t directly control Firefox as it doesn’t have a COM interface (unlike IE). So you’ll have to manually export the bookmarks. Good for us the export is into a JSON file, and PowerShell can read JSON files natively (since version 3.0 I think). The ConvertFrom-JSON cmdlet is your friend here. So export bookmarks and read them into a variable:

This gives me a tree structure of bookmarks.

Notice the children property. It is an array of further objects – links to the first-level folders, basically. Each of these in turn have links to the second-level folders and so on.

The type property is a good way of identifying if a node is a folder or a bookmark. If it’s text/x-moz-place-container then it’s a folder. If it’s text/x-moz-place then it’s a bookmark. (Alternatively one could also test whether the children property is $null).

So how do we go through this tree and search each node? Initially I was going to iteratively do it by going to each node. Then I remembered recursion (see! no exercise like this goes wasted! I had forgotten about recursion). So that’s easy then.

  • Make a function. Pass it the bookmarks object.
  • Said function looks at the object passed to it.
    • If it’s a bookmark it searches the title and lets us know if it’s a match.
    • If it’s a folder, the function calls itself with the next level folder as input.

Here’s the function:

I decided to search folder names too. And just to distinguish between folder names and bookmark names, I use different colors.

Call the function thus (after exporting & reading the bookmarks into a variable):

Here’s a screenshot of the output:

search-fxbookmarks

[Aside] AdBlock Plus

Came across this report yesterday. Turns out AdBlock Plus (ABP) increases memory usage due to the way it works. Check out this post by a Mozilla developer for more info. The latter post also includes responses from the ABP developer. 

I disabled ABP on my browsers. Not because of these reports, but because I had been thinking of disabling it for a while but never got around to it. (I know it’s just a right click and disable away, but I never got around to it! :) Mainly coz I use the excellent Ghostery and Privacy Badger extensions, and these block most of the trackers and widgets I am interested in blocking, so I have never used ABP much. I had installed it a long time ago and it gets installed automatically on all my new Chrome/ Firefox installs thanks to sync, but I never configure or bother with it (except to whitelist a site if I feel ABP could be causing issues with it). Yesterday’s report seemed to be a good excuse to finally remove it. 

This Hacker News post is also worth a read. There are some alternatives like µBlock (seems to be Chrome only) (github link). It is based on HTTP Switchboard and is by the same developer. I have used HTTP Switchboard briefly in the past. Came across it as I was looking for a NoScript equivalent for Chrome and this was recommended. I didn’t use it much though as there was too much configuring and white-listing to do. (For that matter I stopped using NoScript too. It’s still installed but disabled except for its XSS features). Like I said, my favorites now are Ghostery and Privacy Badger – the latter is especially smart in that automatically starts blocking websites based on your browsing patterns (in fact Privacy Badger is based on ABP).